Early Predictors of Alzheimer’s Disease May Not Occur in a Specific Sequence

Early Predictors of Alzheimer’s Disease May Not Occur in a Specific Sequence
A research article, titled, “Subtle Cognitive Decline and Biomarker Staging in Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease” recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease by a team of investigators from the University of California in San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, indicates that the diagnostic picture of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not as black and white as the current scientific understanding of the disease’s progression dictates, and that early indicators or biomarkers (the measures used to perform a clinical assessment ie. blood pressure) of AD development are not anchored in a specific sequence. About Alzheimer’s Disease AD is a neurological disease that causes patients to have debilitating declines in brain function. It affects a patient’s memory, thinking, and cognitive reasoning skills. According to the CDC, as many as 5 million Americans are suffering from AD. The symptoms of the disease often first appear after age 60, and the risk for diagnosis increases substantially with age. It is projected that by 2050 the number of diagnosed cases will be in the range of 14 million. Study Methods In their study, researchers classified 570 cognitively normal participants in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative according to the National Institute of Aging and the Alzheimer’s Associa
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