Nine Risk Factors That May Contribute to Two-Thirds Of Alzheimer’s Disease Globaly

Nine Risk Factors That May Contribute to Two-Thirds Of Alzheimer’s Disease Globaly
Results from a recent study published in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry revealed nine possibly modifiable risk factors that may contribute towards up to two thirds of all cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) worldwide. However, the results also suggest that AD is a complex condition with many risk factors accounting for its development. In the study, a team of researchers indicates that preventive strategies for AD such as those that target drugs, diet, body chemistry, pre-existing disease, mental health, and lifestyle may help people to stave off dementia. These strategies are particularly relevant as there is no cure for dementia. In the study, the team examined risk factors associated with the development of AD and assessed the degree to which these risk factors could be modified in order to reduce overall risk for the condition. Scientists analyzed studies published between 1968 and 2014 and found 323 studies that covered 93 risk factors comprising more than 5000 people. In a pooled analysis, each study was graded based on its strength. The results revealed grade 1 level evidence in favor of a protective effect for cholesterol lowering drugs (statins), anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), female hormone oestrogen and drugs to lower high blood pressure. The results also showed there is the same degree of evidence for the protective effect of vitamins C and E, coffee and folate. High levels of homocysteine - an amino acid manufactured in the body - were strongly associated with depression and an increased risk for AD. Pre-existing conditions were also associated with either
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *