Bryostatin-1 Can Reverse Cognitive Decline in Moderate-to-Severe Alzheimer’s, New Data Shows

Bryostatin-1 Can Reverse Cognitive Decline in Moderate-to-Severe Alzheimer’s, New Data Shows
Neurotrope’s investigational compound Bryostatin-1 showed evidence of sustained improvement in cognition compared to placebo in patients with moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease, according to additional results from a Phase 2 clinical trial. This beneficial effect was sustained for at least four weeks upon ending treatment and was even more pronounced in the absence of the therapy memantine (sold in the U.S. as Namenda and Namzaric). The company now has begun recruiting for a new Phase 2 trial to confirm these results. These results were discussed recently at the 2018 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Chicago, Illinois, in a scientific poster presentation titled, "Significant Cognitive Improvement with Bryostatin for Advanced Alzheimer's Patients in the Absence of Memantine." Bryostatin is a small molecule designed to penetrate the blood-brain-barrier and specifically activate the protein kinase C (PKCϵ). Its activity enhances nerve cells' capacity to communicate with each other, while supporting the repair of damaged communication nodes (synapses). Preclinical studies have demonstrated that treatment with Bryostatin not only restored synapses, but also triggered the formation of new ones while preventing cell death. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 trial (
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