Researchers Reveal Brain Network Alterations in Patients with Dementia

Researchers Reveal Brain Network Alterations in Patients with Dementia
Researchers at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom recently revealed their findings on alterations in the brain network of patients with disorders linked to dementia, namely dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer’s disease. The study was published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging and is entitled “Divergent brain functional network alterations in dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease.” DLB is a common type of progressive dementia that is characterized by a cognitive decline, changes in alertness and attention, visual hallucinations and motor impairment. DLB is responsible for 4 to 8% of the dementia cases, and its symptoms are caused by the accumulation of Lewy bodies within neurons that control memory and motor control. Lewy bodies are deposits of alpha-synuclein protein and the exact function of this protein is not clear, although it is thought to play a role in the communication between brain cells. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cognitive and behavioral problems. It is the most common form of dementia in the elderly, with patients initially experiencing memory loss and confusion that gradually leads to behavior and personality changes, a decline in cognitive abilities and ultimately severe loss of mental function. Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the brain's formation of amyloid plaques (composed of beta-amyloid proteins), and the loss of the connection between neurons that are responsible for mem
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