More than Half of Alzheimer’s Patients Aged 90 or Older Have Used Psychotropic Drugs

More than Half of Alzheimer’s Patients Aged 90 or Older Have Used Psychotropic Drugs
A recent research study conducted at the University of Eastern Finland has found that psychotropic drug use is more common than previously thought among Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients who were diagnosed at 90 years old or older, in comparison to those who were diagnosed at younger age. The study found that patients diagnosed in this age group used antipsychotics five times more often and antidepressants 2.5 times more often than other Alzheimer’s patients. That means 56% of 90 or older Alzheimer’s patients were found to use psychotic drugs previously, whereas only 48% of younger Alzheimer’s patients did so. The study similarly found that 38% of people aged 90 or older also were on psychotropic drugs, even though they had not been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. However, researchers also found that Alzheimer’s patients aged 90 or more used anti-dementia drugs less frequently than younger Alzheimer’s patients (63% vs. 72%, respectively). Titled “Drug use in persons with and without Alzheimer's disease aged 90 years or more,” the study’s results were published in the September issue of Age and Ageing. According to a press release, this study was conducted using the MEDALZ study cohort, which includes data from patients in Finland six months after diagnoses of Alzheimer’s. The study collected data from 67,215 people who we
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