Dealing With the Rapid Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease

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For the majority of people living with Alzheimer’s disease, the condition tends to progress slowly over a number of years. However, for some, the disease may progress much more quickly. There are factors and complications that may cause a sudden decline in an Alzheimer’s patient but these can often be overcome if treated quickly and the person will then revert back to a slower progression of the disease.

MORE: Three experimental tests for early Alzheimer’s detection

According to the Mayo Clinic, some of the common reasons why an Alzheimer’s disease patient may experience a sudden progression of the condition include:

  • Medications: Some Alzheimer’s patients may develop an adverse reaction to their medication. If this is the case, their health care team can prescribe different medications.
  • Infections: Some infections may exacerbate certain Alzheimer’s symptoms including pneumonia, sinus infections, and urinary tract infections. Once treated the patient should return to how they were before.
  • Fatigue: Lack of sleep and fatigue can exacerbate many of the symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Stress: A change in the patient’s social surroundings or environment may trigger stress. Moving home, a change in health care team or change in family dynamics may lead to a temporary progression of symptoms.
  • Vitamin deficiencies: If the patient is deficient in certain vitamins such as vitamin B-12, folate, niacin, or thiamin, this may bring on a rapid progression of symptoms. Regular blood tests can check the levels of these important vitamins.
  • Depression: Depression and anxiety are common in Alzheimer’s patients but can be treated.
  • Thyroid problems: Thyroid problems such as hypothyroidism can exacerbate Alzheimer’s disease symptoms.
  • Other neurological conditions: MRI scans may be needed to rule out the presence of other neurological conditions which may be advancing the Alzheimer’s disease.

MORE: Can vitamin D prevent Alzheimer’s disease?

Alzheimer’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Wendy is a proven blogger and social media manager who has helped to build online communities for businesses and organizations. She currently heads the website’s social outreach online through social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.
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Wendy is a proven blogger and social media manager who has helped to build online communities for businesses and organizations. She currently heads the website’s social outreach online through social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

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4 comments

  1. Tony Hogben says:

    ….I am living with Younger Onset Dementia, diagnosed 2007…..mid 2010 my physical and mental had deteriorated to such an extent, I asked for and was given a drug with adrenalin.
    ….since that time, I have halted the progression of this horrible disease, and whilst a shadow of my former self, I am alive, happy and still living without care…I put all my info on the internet to show and help anyone so affected….
    …www.adbi.com.au….Tony Hogben, Australia.

    • Natalya says:

      Hello Tony, how are you right now? I hope you are well. I have my mom who is also with the same diagnosis. Was thinking maybe it will help her too.
      Thank you,
      Natalya

      • Tony Hogben says:

        …Hi Natalya…….hope it works for Ur Mum , as well as for me………..I am still going strong…God Bless.
        …Tony Hogben…Bribie Island , Queensland Australia
        …web address….www.adbi.com.au

  2. Scott Brantley says:

    My mom was diagnosed and was gone a little over 2 months later, rapid-progression Alzheimers is a real thing…

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