Blood Markers May ID People Most Likely to Gain Cognitively with Aerobic Exercise, Study Reports

Blood Markers May ID People Most Likely to Gain Cognitively with Aerobic Exercise, Study Reports
Blood levels of certain molecules— metabolites and amino acids — may help to identify people with Alzheimer’s disease who are more likely to improve their cognitive skills in response to aerobic exercise, a study suggests. These results were shared in the poster “Plasma Metabolites to Predict Response to Exercise in Alzheimer's Disease” presented during the recent 71st AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo in Anaheim, California. Evidence suggests that physical exercise may help to preserve cognition in Alzheimer's patients and reduce the accumulation of amyloid plaques — one of the hallmarks of the disease — in the brain. “Exercise treatment is a very promising intervention for Alzheimer's patients and is even an effective treatment for cognitive impairment in patients without Alzheimer's," Danni Li, PhD, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota and the study’s senior author, said in a press release. Several Phase 3 trials are testing the potential benefits of exercise in Alzheimer's disease. However, patients' response to exercise varies, and effective tools that can help spot those patients most likely to respond best to this therapeutic approach would be helpful. "[We know] that not everyone responds to exercise in the same
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