New Canadian Study Disproves Theory Of Lyme Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease Linkage

New Canadian Study Disproves Theory Of Lyme Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease Linkage
Assertions of a potential link between Lyme disease and Alzheimer’s deaths have been shown baseless by new research at the University of Toronto Mississauga odaydanA U of T Mississauga release notes that while researching his book “The Alzheimer’s Epidemic—Searching for Causes and a Cure” (Emeritus Books), U of T Mississauga Professor Emeritus Danton O’Day was intrigued to discover studies and popular professional opinion supporting a potential link between Lyme disease and Alzheimer’s deaths. In 2012, there were 315 reported cases of Lyme disease in Canada, although the Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation estimates the actual number to be in the thousands. Alzheimer’s disease affects 750,000 Canadians. According to Texas A&M University’s Lyme Lab, Lyme disease (LD) is a zoonotic, tick-borne illness spread to humans through the bite of ticks infected with corkscrew-shaped bacteria known as Borrelia burgdorferi. Part of the spirochete family of bacteria, B. burgdorferi can cause neuroborreliosis, which can lead to dementia. Alzheimer’s disease causes a similar loss of cognitive ability and, eventually, death. Lyme is the most prevalent arthropod-borne infection in the United States, with a total of 22,572 human
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