Slow Walking, Cognitive Issues May Predict Alzheimer’s Risk

Slow Walking, Cognitive Issues May Predict Alzheimer’s Risk
cognitive issues and alzheimer'sA simple test that measures how fast people walk and whether they have cognitive issues can determine how likely they are to develop dementia, which includes diseases such as Alzheimer’s, within 12 years. These are the conclusions of a study led by scientists at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the Montefiore Medical Center. The study, led by neurology and geriatrics professor Joe Verghese and published on July 16th in the journal Neurology (the official journal of the American Academy of Neurology), involved thousands of older people from 17 different countries. Its aim was to report the prevalence of motoric cognitive risk syndrome — a newly described predementia syndrome characterized by slow walking and cognitive complaints — in multiple countries, as well as its association with dementia risk. Researchers analyzed motoric cognitive risk syndrome prevalence in individual data from 26,802 adults without dementia and disability aged 60 years and older from 17 countries. In addition, they examined the risk of incident cognitive impairment and dementia associated with motoric cognitive risk in 4,812 individuals without dementia.

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