Major Study Finds Different Forms Of Alzheimer’s Have Similar Effects On Brain Networks

Major Study Finds Different Forms Of Alzheimer’s Have Similar Effects On Brain Networks
Brain NetworksA major new study by an international team of scientists anchored at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has revealed that brain networks break down similarly in both rare, inherited forms of Alzheimer's disease, and in much more common uninherited versions of the disorder. In both types of Alzheimer's, a basic brain function component starts to decline about five years before onset of symptoms, such as memory loss, becomes obvious. The researchers say breakdown occurs in resting state functional connectivity, which involves groups of brain regions with activity levels that rise and fall in coordination with each other, and believe this synchronization helps the regions form networks that work together or stay out of each others way during mental tasks. The original investigation report, published online before print in the journal JAMA Neurology entitled "Functional Connectivity in Autosomal Dominant and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease" (JAMA Neurol. Published online July 28, 2014. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.1654 — for lists of the coauthors and associated institutions, see editor's note below). The coauthors note that Autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) is caused by rare genetic mutations in three specific genes, in contrast to late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD), which has a
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