Memory, Alzheimer’s Dynamic Mechanisms Revealed in New Study

Memory, Alzheimer’s Dynamic Mechanisms Revealed in New Study
A study newly published in the journal Nature Neuroscience reveals that activity within the memory-oriented brain region of the hippocampus is in fact bidirectional, a key observation that could fuel new advancements into Alzheimer's research. The study, entitled "Reversal of theta rhythm flow through intact hippocampal circuits," (Nature Neuroscience (2014) doi:10.1038/nn.3803) is coauthored by Dr. Sylvain Williams, PhD, and his research team; Jesse Jackson, Bénédicte Amilhon, Frédéric Manseau, andChristian Kortleven at the Research Centre of the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University, at Montreal, Canada; Romain Goutagny ad Jean-Bastien Bott of Université de Strasbourg-CNRS, Strasbourg, France; and Steven L Bresslerof the Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida; may lead to an increased understanding of how neural circuitry works within the brain, impacting dynamic mechanisms that control memory and the role that the subiculum, a major component of the hippocampus, plays in brain health and cognition. In 2009, the researchers developed an in vitro preparation of a hippocampal formation. Now, Dr. Williams's research team has been successful in further demonstrating via a mouse model that memory activity within the hippocampus region of the brain does not flow unidirectionally, a revelation that reverses nearly one hundred years of established science. In the Nature Neuroscience paper, the coauthors note that activity flow through the hippocampus is thought to arise exclusively from unidirectional excitatory synaptic signaling from CA3 to CA1 to the subiculum, and that Theta rhythms are important for hippocampal synchronization during episodic memory processing
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