Alzheimer’s Disease Culture System Confirms Landmark Hypothesis

Alzheimer’s Disease Culture System Confirms Landmark Hypothesis
amyloid hypothesisA pioneering in vitro culture model of Alzheimer’s disease was established for the first time by researchers from the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), entitled “A three-dimensional human neural cell culture model of Alzheimer’s disease.” The study, which was recently published in the Nature journal, by Se Hoon Choi, PhD, and Young Hye Kim of the MGH Genetics and Aging Research Unit, co-lead authors of the work, will enable researchers to recapitulate all the pathological processes and identify key players that contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer’s disease is the most frequent form of dementia, characterized by two important pathological features: amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease posits that the excessive accumulation of amyloid-β peptide leads to neurofibrillary tangles composed of aggregated tau hyperphosphorylated. However, until now, there were no disease models that had linked these two sequential pathological processes. The mouse models with familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) mutations show amyloid-β-induced synaptic and memory deficits, but do not fully recapitu
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