Experts Contest US Government Goals to Prevent Alzheimer’s by 2025

Experts Contest US Government Goals to Prevent Alzheimer’s by 2025
A group of experts on Alzheimer's Disease are contesting the U.S. Government's pro-active plans to prevent and treat the disease until 2025, as they believe the milestones defined by the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease need to be broadened in scope, increased in scale, and adequately funded in order to be successful. Almost 40 researchers and scientists have proposed a series of measures to enlarge and strengthen the governmental plan in an article published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, entitled, "Perspective on the '2014 Report on the Milestones for the US National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease.'" "Many prominent investigators believe the prospect of delaying the onset of disabling symptoms within a decade is an attainable goal, provided we can surmount several scientific, administrative, and most importantly, financial impediments," wrote the authors, which include both academic and industry experts from different areas of studies regarding Alzheimer's. "Inadequate funding remains the single most important impediment to progress in achieving the research goal of the National Plan." The proposals take into account the fact that in the United States alone there are over five million people living with Alzheimer's, costing the country about $214 billion annually, according to the numbers of the "Alzheimer's Association 2014 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures" report. With the increase of the average life expectancy in the U.S., the numbers tend to rise even more, with estimates of the disease affecting 16 million patients, leading to $1.2 trillion in costs for the nation by 2050. The researchers believe that the governmental action needs to be faster and stronger to counteract this trend.
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