Design Of Micro And Nanoparticles To Improve Treatments For Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases

Design Of Micro And Nanoparticles To Improve Treatments For Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases
At the Faculty of Pharmacy of the University of the Basque Country (Basque - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea; Spanish - Universidad del Pas Vasco - UPV/EHU) in Leioa, northern Spain, encapsulation techniques are being developed to deliver correctly and effectively certain drugs used to treat neurological diseases. Enara Herran, a researcher at the University of the Basque Country's Departments of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, is working to improve the way Alzheimer's and Parkinson's treatments are administered, observing understatedly that, "both diseases are becoming more and more common in our society." Both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's affect key components of the nervous system called neurones (also known as a neuron or nerve cell) -- electrically excitable cells that process and transmit information through electrical and chemical signals. In these diseases, neurone structure and function are lost, in turn leading to deterioration in the patient's motor, cognitive, sensory and emotional functions. As Dr. Herran points out in a UPV/EHU release, in many cases drugs used to treat both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's only mitigate the symptoms; they do not act on the origin of the disease. "The treatment is usually on the basis of tablets taken by mouth." However, drugs of this type are not the only ones used to tackle both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Some drugs prevent neuron loss and help new ones to form; growth factors, for example. "In any case, they are not used so much because there is no effective, safe way of delivering them," explains Dr. Herran, noting that the drugs have to pass through the blood-brain barrier to reach the neurons,
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.