Dismantling the Brain’s “GPS” Might Help Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease

Dismantling the Brain’s “GPS” Might Help Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease
In patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease or dealing with the aftermath of a stroke, a lack of orientation -- as if their inner perception of the world in which they always lived in just disappeared -- is common. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine induced a version of this loss of orientation in rats and observed important clues to the mystery of why strokes and Alzheimer's disease can really destroy the sense of direction. The study was published as one of the Cell Reports. Grid cells and other specific nerve cells placed in the brain are known as "place cells." Together, they make a sort of "brain's inner GPS," as noted in a recent press release. This discovery by John O’Keefe, PhD, director of the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre in Neural Circuits and Behavior at University College London in the United Kingdom, and May-Britt Moser, PhD and her husband Edvard Moser, PhD, both professors of neuroscience at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. The team was recently awarded with the
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.