Researchers Debate Oligomeric Abeta-induced Synaptic Dysfunction Found In Alzheimer’s

Researchers Debate Oligomeric Abeta-induced Synaptic Dysfunction Found In Alzheimer’s
shutterstock_145172992A recent review from Schichun Tu and colleagues entitled “Oligomeric Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease” was published this week in the journal Molecular Neurodegeneration. The aim of the study was to discuss the state of current evidence suggesting that the synaptic loss found in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is induced by soluble amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta, Aβ) oligomers. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a gradual decline in cognitive functioning, occurring in people aged 65 years or above, with a progressive decline in memory, thinking, language, and learning capacity. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that 5.4 million Americans have the disease and that one in eight older people will develop AD. There is no cure for AD and available treatments only target temporary memory and cognitive functioning improvements. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms that are involved in the pathogenesis of AD may help further pharmacological inputs. AD is caused by a decline and death of neurons that it is initiated in the hippocampus, the brain region involved in memory and learning. With the progression of the disease, the death of the neurons affects the entire brain. Amyloid beta is a peptide tha
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