Cognitive Function in Older Patients Improved With Cocoa-derived Flavonoids in Recent Study

Cognitive Function in Older Patients Improved With Cocoa-derived Flavonoids in Recent Study
cocoa flavanolA study entitled “Enhancing dentate gyrus function with dietary flavanols improves cognition in older adults,” published this month in Nature Neuroscience, found that a cocoa flavanol containing diet ameliorates cognitive function in older people. The dentate gyrus (DG) is a region in the hippocampal formation whose function declines with normal human aging and it is thought to be a potential source of age-related memory decline. Studies in mice have shown that ingestion of epicatechin, a molecule derived from cocoa solids, improved the branching of neurons in the DG. However, studies showing evidence of a causal link between DG-associated memory decline are necessary. Additionally, there is a lack of randomized-controlled intervention studies aimed at testing potential sources of improving DG function. The team of researchers led by Adam M Brickman from Columbia University in New York conducted a study using a high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Subsequently, researchers conducted a randomized-controlled, double masked trial intervention in a population of 37 healthy individuals aged 50–69-years. Participants were assigned in either a high (900 mg per day) or low (45 mg per day) cocoa flavanol–containing diet for 3 months. Each group was also allocated into an exercise vs. no exercise group. Results from this int
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *