Preparing Foods at High Temperatures Might Increase the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

Preparing Foods at High Temperatures Might Increase the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease
A recent study found that preparing foods at high temperatures might increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The results were published in the current issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. The research team from The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai examined studies that assessed the content AGEs (advanced glycation end products) in diets and compared the total AGE’s with rates of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). AGEs combine sugars, proteins and other large molecules, and can either be produced in the body when food is cooked at high temperatures or when food is aged for a long time. Evidence from recent studies has found a relationship between AGEs and Alzheimer’s disease, and also that AGEs increase the risk for several chronic diseases due to inflammation and oxidative stress. Furthermore, evidence has shown that AGEs can bind the RAGE receptor that transports beta-amyloid proteins through the blood-strain, thus contributing to AD development. In their study, the team of researchers conducted estimations of AGE content diets and the risk of AD. To do this, they used quantified AGEs for different food types that were taken for a study from Mount Sinai School of Medicine researchers. Then they prepared 549 foods with different cooking methods and assessed the AGE content of these prepared foods. Results revealed that high cooking temperatures were related t
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