Amyloidosis Links Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

Amyloidosis Links Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease
Researchers at the Uppsala University in Sweden recently found a molecular link between Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease based on a rare condition called amyloidosis that occurs in both conditions. The study is published in the American Journal of Pathology. Amyloidosis results from the accumulation of inappropriately folded proteins called amyloids. When proteins that are normally soluble in water fold to become amyloids, they become insoluble and deposit in tissues or organs, disrupting normal function. In their study titled “In Vivo Seeding and Cross-Seeding of Localized Amyloidosis: A Molecular Link between Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer Disease” Gunilla T. Westermark, Ph.D., Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Sweden and colleagues discovered that brain amyloid can motivate the growth of fibrils in the murine pancreas. This pancreatic amyloid can be found in human senile brains. Patients with Type 2 diabetes commonly have Islet amyloid, a polypeptide (IAPP), derived from its precursor proIAPP. Evidence has shown that accumulation of IAPP can lead to beta-cell death. In Alzheimer’s disease, evidence has shown beta-amyloid deposits in the brain cortex and blood vessels. "Several soluble proteins are amyloid forming in humans. Independent of protein origin, the fibrils produced are morphologically similar," said Gunilla T. Westermark, PhD, Department of Medical Cell Biology at Uppsala University in a recent news release. "There is a potential for structures with amyloid-seeding ability to induce both homologous and heterologous fibril growth. Heterologous seeding between IAPP and beta-amyloid may represent a molecular link between AD and T2D." Recent evidence shows that patients with Type 2 diabetes are two times m
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