Australian Scientists Make Alzheimer’s Treatment Breakthrough Using Ultrasound Technology

Australian Scientists Make Alzheimer’s Treatment Breakthrough Using Ultrasound Technology
Scientists at Australia's University of Queensland have found that non-invasive ultrasound technology can be used to break up neurotoxic amyloid plaques that cause memory loss and cognitive decline in persons afflicted with Alzheimer's Disease (AD), which affects more than two-thirds of dementia patients. The discovery is elucidated in a paper published in the March 11 edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine entitled "Scanning ultrasound removes amyloid- and restores memory in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model" (Sci Transl Med 11 March 2015: Vol. 7, Issue 278, p. 278ra33 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa2512) coauthored by PhD student Gerhard Leinenga and Professor Jurgen Götz of the Queensland Brain Institute's Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research, at the University of Queensland St. Lucia Campus in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, who note that Amyloid- (A) peptide has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. The researchers present a nonpharmacological approach for removing A and restoring memory function in a mouse model of AD in which A is deposited in the brain. They discovered that repeated scanning ultrasound (SUS) treatments of the mouse brain can remove A without resort to any additional therapeutic agents such as anti-A antibody. Dr. Götz and Mr. Leinenga employed spinning disk confocal microscopy and high-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction to reveal extensive internalization of A into the lysosomes
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