Study Finds Evidence That the MIND Diet May Protect Patients From Developing Alzheimer’s Disease

Study Finds Evidence That the MIND Diet May Protect Patients From Developing Alzheimer’s Disease
Researchers at the Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL and Harvard School of Public Health in Boston recently published results from an observational study that showed when a patient’s dietary intake is modified it could significantly lower their risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study entitled, “MIND diet associated with reduced incidence of Alzheimer's disease,” was published in the online February 11th edition of Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. Dr. Martha Clare Morris, ScD, Professor Director, Section of Nutrition & Nutritional Epidemiology, Assistant Provost for Community Research, Co-Director, Rush Translational Sciences Consortium, Rush University, lead study author, and her colleagues developed the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet. MIND is a mix of two other dietary modification plans that have previously been shown to lower the risk of cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, heart attack, and stroke: Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets. The researchers describe the MIND diet as emphasizing natural plant-based foods, specifically promoting an increase in the consumption of berries and green leafy vegetables; with limited intakes of animal-based and high saturated fat foods.  The diet also does not specify a need for high fruit (other than berries), potato, or dairy consumption. The MIND diet has a maximum score of 15 and includes: 10 brain healthy food groups: green leafy vegetables other vegetables nuts berries beans whole grains fish poultry olive oil wine 5 unhealthy brain food groups: red meats butter and stick margarine cheese pastries and sweets frie
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