High Prevalence of Undiagnosed Pre-diabetes Discovered in Early Alzheimer’s disease

High Prevalence of Undiagnosed Pre-diabetes Discovered in Early Alzheimer’s disease
Last year, as part of a large nationwide study, Scott Turner, MD, PhD., neurologist at Georgetown University, began to enroll participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and found that a major part of the study participants had undiagnosed glucose intolerance. As Dr. Turner said in a recent news release, he was surprised by the amount of participants who had pre-diabetes. The study, which assessed resveratrol, a compound present in red wine and red grapes, examined if this compound was associated with changes in the levels of glucose in participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). According to Dr. Turner, resveratrol is thought to act on brain proteins mimicking the effects of a diet low in calories. "We know from animal studies that caloric restriction prevents diseases of aging such as diabetes and Alzheimer's," explained Turner who is the director of the Georgetown University Medical Center's Memory Disorders Program. "On the flip side of the coin, having diabetes increases one's risk of developing AD. So perhaps by improving glucose tolerance, we will prevent or delay both diabetes and Alzheimer's." At study enrolment, all participants had a fasting glucose tolerance test, and then they had the same test two hours after eating. During digestion, the blood sugar level increases, but the pancreas produces insulin to lower it. After two hours, high levels of sugar, demonstrate
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