Survival in Frontotemporal Dementia Found To Be Increased in People With More Demanding Jobs

Survival in Frontotemporal Dementia Found To Be Increased in People With More Demanding Jobs
Findings from a recent study published in the journal Neurology revealed that individuals with more skilled jobs may live longer after developing frontotemporal dementia in comparison with individuals with less skilled jobs. Frontotemporal dementia is a condition that mainly affects individuals aged under 65 years and causes personality or behavior changes and language problems. "This study suggests that having a higher occupational level protects the brain from some of the effects of this disease, allowing people to live longer after developing the disease," said study author Lauren Massimo, PhD, CRNP, of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania State University in State College and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. Results from this study add evidence to the "cognitive reserve" theory concerning the fact that more educated people with more intellectual activity have a buffering protection against the condition. "People with frontotemporal dementia typically live six to 10 years after the symptoms emerge, but little has been known about what factors contribute to this range," Massimo said in the news release. The research team reviewed clinical records from autopsy of a total of 83 patients who had a frontotemporal dementia or Alzheimer's disease diagnosis, and also used data about the patient
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