Study Uncovers Link Between Main Culprit of Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Loss

Study Uncovers Link Between Main Culprit of Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Loss
In a recent study published in the open access Nature Publishing Group journal Scientific Reports, Sussex Neuroscience researchers found a direct association between the main culprit of Alzheimer's disease and memory loss. Alzheimer's disease is caused by the formation and accumulation of amyloid plaques in the tissue of the brain. Amyloid plaques are formed of an insoluble protein, called "Amyloid-beta" (Abeta), creating small structures called 'oligomers' that are key in the progression of the disease. However, little is known about how these proteins lead to memory loss in Alzheimer’s disease. The research team led by Lenzie Ford examined how Abeta disturbed the healthy brains of pond snails (known as Lymnaea stagnates) by looking at the effect of the administration of the protein after a food-reward behavioral task. The researchers observed that the pond snails that received Abeta had their memories significantly compromised 24 hours later when examined with a food task, even though there was no damage in the tissue of their brains. According to Lenzie Ford, these results revealed that Abeta by itself can trigger the memory loss found in patients with Alzheimer's disease. She said in a recent news release, "what we observed was that snail brains remained apparently healthy even after the application of the protein. There was no loss of brain tissue, no signs of cell death, no chang
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