Study Finds Possible Association Between Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnosis

Study Finds Possible Association Between Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnosis
A study published in the latest edition of the journal PLOS Medicine used gene variant analysis to assess the association between modifiable risk factors and individual patient susceptibility to being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).  The study, entitled “Associations between Potentially Modifiable Risk Factors and Alzheimer Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study” was led by Robert Scott of the MRC Epidemiology Unit at University of Cambridge in collaboration with teams of researchers across the globe. The international collaborative team of investigators utilized a standardized method of genetic analysis, in which they distinguished gene variants in a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs are the most common cause of genetic variation in organisms. These differences are due to a change in a nucleotide, which is the building block of DNA. Researchers use SNPs to help identify susceptibility factors to diseases such as AD. Numerous studies have established that there are several potential risk factors for AD, but the causative influence of these factors on diagnosis is still not understood. Without knowledge of a causative agent, it is unclear whether certain interventions to modify risk behaviors will have any benefit in preventing an individual’s diagnosis of AD. In an effort to understand the causative nature of these risk f
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