Alzheimer’s Study Finds Omega-3 Supplement, Stimulation Slow Cognitive Decline

Alzheimer’s Study Finds Omega-3 Supplement, Stimulation Slow Cognitive Decline

During the  8th International Conference on Clinical Trials for Alzheimer's Disease (CTAD) held in Barcelona, Spain, data from the MAPT study of older adults with memory lapses was presented. This study suggested that the combination of a multi-domain nutritional and stimulation intervention plus an omega-3 fatty acid supplementation slows cognitive decline in older adults, and particularly in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

The MAPT trial, Omega-3 Fatty Acids and/or Multi-domain Intervention in the Prevention of Age-related Cognitive Decline, was conceived to evaluate the combination of a supplement (docosahexaenoic acid or DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid that is a primary structural component of the human brain and elsewhere) and multi-domain training — nutritional advise, exercise, and cognitive and social stimulation — as opposed to other approaches. Importantly, DHA has been suggested to possess anti-inflammatory proprieties and to be associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Bruno Vellas, MD, PhD, of the University of Toulouse in France, and colleagues randomized 1,680 patients, ages 70 and up with subjective memory complaints, into four groups: DHA (800 mg/day) alone, DHA (800 mg/day) plus multi-domain training, placebo plus multi-domain training, and placebo alone. The multi-domain training was preformed in 12, two-hour sessions of groups of six to eight participants over a two-month period. Training then switched to hourlong sessions every month. The study's primary endpoint was a change of memory function at three years, as assessed by the Free and Cu
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