Alzheimer’s-Linked Protein Seems to Respond to Exercise

Alzheimer’s-Linked Protein Seems to Respond to Exercise
Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, both physically and mentally. Now, a new study suggests that physical activity may not only boost brainpower, it might even prevent Alzheimer's disease. Researchers from St. Louis, Missouri, studied mice with an experimental form of Alzheimer's disease and found that those mice doing the most exercise had the greatest  reduction in the toxic protein beta-amyloid. The study, titled "A spectrum of exercise training reduces soluble Aβ in a dose-dependent manner in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease," appeared on Nov. 10 in the journal Neurobiology of Disease. Alzheimer's disease (AD) robs people of their memory and, ultimately, their life due to an accumulation of molecules that destroy brain cells, including the proteins beta-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau. About 5.3 million people in the U.S. have AD and an estimated 473,000 will develop the disease this year alone. Five FDA-approved drugs exist to treat this  degenerative neurological disease, however, these medications only marginally delay symptoms. They can neither cure AD  nor stop its progression. The scientists, led by Kaitlin M. Moore of Department of Biomedical Sciences, Missouri State University, Springfield, studied mice with
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