Moderate Drinking Appears to Benefit Patients with Early Onset Alzheimer’s

Moderate Drinking Appears to Benefit Patients with Early Onset Alzheimer’s
Drinking alcohol in moderation every day — defined as two-to-three units per day — may be associated with a significantly lower mortality among people with early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a Danish study recently published in the BMJ Open journal and titled “Alcohol consumption and mortality in patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease: a prospective cohort study.’ The negative effects of excessive alcohol consumption on both physiological and psychological health are well-established. Several population cohort studies suggest, however, that not all alcohol consumption is harmful. In fact, moderate consumption appears to have beneficial effects on most people, decreasing the risk of death from cardiovascular disease and stroke. But as alcohol is known to damage brain cells, and dementia is a neurodegenerative disorder, researchers questioned whether drinking might be particularly dangerous for those with such disorders. To investigate whether the positive association between moderate alcohol intake and cardiovascular death documented in population-based studies on healthy subjects could be transferred to patients with mild AD, Sine Berntsen and colleagues examined 321 patients with mild AD (Mini-Mental State Examination score of 20 or less). Data regarding current daily alcohol consumption were obtained from the patient’s primary caregivers at inclusion. The main goal of the post
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