Role of Microbes in Alzheimer’s Disease Demands Research and Testing, Scientists Say in Editorial

Role of Microbes in Alzheimer’s Disease Demands Research and Testing, Scientists Say in Editorial
An editorial by a large number of senior Alzheimer’s researchers urges the scientific community to take a serious look at evidence pointing to the contribution of microbes in the development of Alzheimer’s disease – and calling for more clinical research. Published online in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease by 31 international scientists, the editorial suggests that certain microorganisms — a common virus and two specific types of bacteria — are major causes of a large proportion of all Alzheimer’s cases. The editorial summarizes extensive published research showing that microbes are likely implicated in dementia, and contribute to the buildup of amyloid beta. This body of work has been dismissed as controversial and largely ignored by the scientific community. As a result, proposals for funding relevant clinical trials have been continuously refused, hindering research. More than 400 clinical Alzheimer’s trials investigating other concepts, however, were funded and returned disappointing results over the past decade. Opposition to new research findings is likely as old as science itself. Similar opposition was voiced when researchers proposed that viruses might cause certain cancers, or that bacteria can cause stomach ulcers — concepts that were proved valid and are mainstream today, allowing for more effective treatments of these conditions. Likewise, clinical trials of antimicrobial drugs in patients with Alzheimer’s disease could provide a clearer picture of the potential role microbes play in the development of dementia. Professor Douglas Kell at the
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.