Early Alzheimer’s Patients in Nutrition Study Found to Gain in Memory and Other Abilities

Early Alzheimer’s Patients in Nutrition Study Found to Gain in Memory and Other Abilities
European scientists have demonstrated that a nutritional drink, Fortasyn Connect, does not benefit broad cognitive function to the degree expected, but it can help to conserve brain tissue and memory in early, or prodromal, Alzheimer's disease patients. The clinical trial is part of the LipiDiDiet project, a large European study exploring the therapeutic and preventative effects of nutrition on neuronal and cognitive performance in aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia. Cognitive decline over the trial's two-year period, however, was less than that anticipated when the study was designed a decade ago, so cognitive differences between its treatment and control groups were not found to be statistically significant. "Today's results are extremely valuable as they bring us closer to understanding the impact of nutritional interventions on prodromal AD which we are now better at diagnosing but unable to treat due to a lack of approved pharmaceutical options. The LipiDiDiet study illustrates that this nutritional intervention can help to conserve brain tissue and also memory and patients' ability to perform everyday tasks — possibly the most troubling aspects of the disease. We look forward to the results of subsequent analyses and the six year-extension study which will provide further insights,” Professor Hilkka Soininen, MD, PhD, a professor in Neurology from the University of Eastern Finland, who headed the trial, said in a press release. Fortasyn Connect was the drink selected by the team of experts from 19 European institutes. The aim of the multicenter, randomized, and double-blind trial in 3
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