Study of Alzheimer’s Patients Finds Low Frequency Sound Stimulation Improves Cognition

Study of Alzheimer’s Patients Finds Low Frequency Sound Stimulation Improves Cognition
Results of a new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease by a team of researchers at the University of Toronto, Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, and the Baycrest Centre in Toronto, Canada, reports the investigators' assessment of the effect of stimulating the somatosensory systems of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with 40Hz sound (think sub-woofer bass) at three stages of their illness's degenerative progression. The report, "Rhythmic Sensory Stimulation in Alzheimer's Short-Term Effects of Disease: An Exploratory Pilot Study," was co-authored by Amy Clements-Cortes, Heidi Ahonen, Michael Evans, Morris Freedman, and Lee Bartel. ClementsCortesAStudy coordinator and research team member Amy Clements-Cortes is a registered psychotherapist with the College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario (CRPO), an assistant professor in the University of Toronto Faculty of Music (LTA), a music therapy instructor and graduate supervisor at Wilfrid Laurier University, and senior music therapist/practice advisor at Toronto's Baycrest Centre. Her business,
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