Failures in Alzheimer’s Vaccine Efforts Result of Research Errors, Scientist Says, And Suggests Ways of Correcting Them

Failures in Alzheimer’s Vaccine Efforts Result of Research Errors, Scientist Says, And Suggests Ways of Correcting Them
All failed attempts to produce a viable vaccine against amyloid-beta in Alzheimer’s disease have one thing in common — they all used vaccine adjuvants that elicit the wrong kind of immune response, says Qantu Therapeutics' president and CSO, Dante J. Marciani, in a sweeping retrospective analysis that covers errors in past and current development efforts and recommends ways of correcting them. According to the analysis, A retrospective analysis of the Alzheimer's disease vaccine progress - The critical need for new development strategies," vaccine development in Alzheimer’s started off on the wrong foot. The Phase 2 clinical trial of the first vaccine, called AN1792, was abruptly terminated when it became clear that the drug triggered the development of meningoencephalitis — a life-threatening inflammation of the brain and the membranes surrounding it. The vaccine used a molecule called QS-21 as an adjuvant. Vaccine adjuvants are compounds boosting the immune response to an antigen — the structure a vaccine is targeting. At times, the adjuvant is absolutely crucial for eliciting an immune response against an antigen. Most adjuvants trigger an immune response that is a mix of reactions by immune cells called Th1 and Th2. To simplify, one can say that Th1 reactions are pro-inflammatory while Th2 promotes an anti-inflammatory response with the production of protective antibodies. According to Dr. Marciani, the failure of the first vaccine was that the adjuvant QS-21 elicited a strong Th1, or pro-inflammatory response, that was absolutely devastating in the brain. And, as Dr. Marciani presents his case, all vaccine-development attempts since h
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