Alzheimer Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment Need to Be Standardized, Scientist Says

Alzheimer Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment Need to Be Standardized, Scientist Says
Professor Gunhild Waldemar, director of the Danish Dementia Research Center (DDRC), was a guest speaker at the recent Second Congress of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) in Copenhagen, and she encouraged researchers to work together to develop standardized guidelines for early diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). She reinforced the notion that effective treatments for AD are possible, and said the pressure to achieve a breakthrough has never been higher, noting: "European science could play a leading role, providing that it adopts a concerted approach and sufficient funds are made available. While research is expensive, standing by helplessly is even more so." According to a press release, the cost of treating dementia can climb to 72,500 euros per person per year in the European Union, and up to 70% of these cases can be linked to AD. Experts expect the number of cases worldwide to rise to 75 million in 2030, from 47 million in 2015, due to population aging. In the global economy, dementia is estimated to have cost $818 billion in 2015. Researchers have not been able to find treatments to stop or reverse AD, because they lack "a better understanding of the neurodegenerative mechanisms," Professor Waldemar said. "The assumption that dementia is simply an unavoidable part of getting old is plain wrong: half of people aged 90 do not suffer from memory disorders." Early identification through biomarkers (either in the blood or spinal fluid), gene testing,
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *