‘Far Better’ Map of Human Brain, Open to Researchers, Identifies 97 New Regions

‘Far Better’ Map of Human Brain, Open to Researchers, Identifies 97 New Regions
In mid-July, scientists at the Washington University Medical School, Saint Louis, published a study that inspired awe in fellow researchers — an updated map of the cerebral cortex of the human brain, identifying nearly 100 new areas. The exceedingly intricate and updated map, published in the journal Nature under the title "A multi-modal parcellation of human cerebral cortex," is likely to not only be invaluable for scientists worldwide in their understanding of the normal workings of the brain, but also in helping researchers to learn how normal processes go haywire in conditions like Alzheimer’s disease. “These new insights and tools should help to explain how our cortex evolved and the roles of its specialized areas in health and disease, and could eventually hold promise for unprecedented precision in brain surgery and clinical work-ups,” Bruce Cuthbert, PhD, acting director of  National Institute of Mental Health, a branch of the National Institutes of Health that co-funded the research as part of The Human Connectome Project, said in a NIH release. Interest in understanding the brain by mapping its various regions is not new. During the 19th century, this was a popular field of research. Scientists such as Paul Broca and Carl Wernicke identified brain areas linked to speech production — to this day referred to as Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas. In 1907, a brain scientist called Korbinian Brodmann took on
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