Researchers Find Some ‘Wiggle Room’ in Fight Against Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers Find Some ‘Wiggle Room’ in Fight Against Alzheimer’s Disease
Using laser technology, researchers have found that peptides related to Alzheimer's Disease move at dangerous speeds prior to clumping or forming the plaques that characterize the disease. Moreover, the scientists also identified strategies to keep the blocks that form the proteins moving at safe speeds. The study, “Monomer Dynamics of Alzheimer Peptides and Kinetic Control of Early Aggregation in Alzheimer’s Disease," was published in the journal ChemPsysChem. Aggregation, or clustering, of proteins is the underlying cause of a large and growing number of degenerative and chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a condition affects one in nine people 65 and older. AD is characterized by neuronal cell death and dementia apparently caused, at least in part, by aggregation of the amyloid beta peptide. "Strings of 40 amino acids are the ones most commonly found in healthy individuals, but strings of 42 are much more likely to clump," Lisa Lapidus, PhD, Michigan State University professor of physics and astronomy and study lead author, said in a press release. "We found that the peptides' wiggle speeds, the step before aggregation, was five times slower for the longer strings, which leaves plenty of time
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