Dementia Cases Declined by 24% in US Between 2000-12, Study Reports

Dementia Cases Declined by 24% in US Between 2000-12, Study Reports
At a time when predictions of a dementia epidemic flourish, a recent study demonstrated that the rates have actually gone down in the U.S. — echoing findings from other studies that suggest that the idea of an epidemic is unfounded. Forces behind the decline in dementia diagnoses are complex, and at the moment, it is difficult to conclude which contributing factors matter the most. Rising levels of education, improved health behavior, and better treatments for heart and metabolic problems are, however, top candidates, the researchers reported. The study, “A Comparison of the Prevalence of Dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012,” was published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Predictions of increased numbers of dementia diagnoses mostly stem from the fact that the U.S. population is aging. The Alzheimer’s Association states that the number of people living with the disease may triple through 2050. However, recent reports indicate that, although older people make up a growing part of the population, the increase may be balanced by fewer people falling ill — at least in high-income countries. A study from England reported that, between 1991 and 2011, there were 24 percent fewer demential cases than expected, and other studies report similar numbers. Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School examined the number of people diagnosed with dementia in the year 2000, compar
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *