At-home Occupational Therapy Fails to Slow Decline in Alzheimer’s Patients in Study

At-home Occupational Therapy Fails to Slow Decline in Alzheimer’s Patients in Study
Two years of in-home occupational therapy, added to collaborative care, did not slow the rate of functional decline — the progressive loss of cognitive, emotional, and physical abilities — in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), a new study reported. The study, “Targeting Functional Decline in Alzheimer Disease: A Randomized Trial,” was published in Annals of Internal Medicine. “Over the typical [Alzheimer’s] disease course of 5 to 10 years, the condition results in progressive functional disability, frequent transitions in care, and excess health care costs,” Christopher M. Callahan, MD, with the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, and colleagues wrote, according to a news release. “During the past decade, several studies focusing on functional decline among patients with Alzheimer’s disease have shown the potential of home-based interventions to slow this decline.” To determine whether collaborative care plus extended, home-based occupational therapy could delay functional decline, Callahan and colleagues conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial (NCT01314950), in 180 people with a diagnosis of possible or probable AD. Patients were randomly assigned to either a control group, rece
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