Georgetown to Lead Phase 2 Study of Cancer Drug in Treating Alzheimer’s

Georgetown to Lead Phase 2 Study of Cancer Drug in Treating Alzheimer’s
Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) are recruiting participants for a clinical trial to evaluate the cancer drug Tasigna (nilotinib) in people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 clinical trial (NCT02947893) will evaluate how low doses of Tasigna impact safety, biomarkers, and clinical outcomes in 42 patients with mild to moderate AD. Tasigna, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is used to treat a blood cancer called Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The drug is usually administered when patients have failed to improve on other medications. It was approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2010, and has been authorized in the European Union since 2007. Safety, the trial's primary focus, will be assessed based on the number of participants who experience adverse events or have abnormal laboratory values after 12 months of treatment. The effect of the yearlong treatment is the secondary endpoint. Researchers will assess the drug's ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, decrease beta-amyloid plaque in the brain, and reduce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of cell death. The study, partially supported with $2.1 million from The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation<
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