Interaction Between Air Pollution, Genetics May Create Significant Risk of Alzheimer’s

Interaction Between Air Pollution, Genetics May Create Significant Risk of Alzheimer’s
High levels of air pollution particles may increase the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in older women, according to results of a new study. These particles, found in emissions from power plants and cars, increase the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s, by as much as 92%, especially in women with the ApoE4 gene variant, which has been associated with this disease. These findings also may have serious implications for the general population, as pollution is one of the world’s most profound issues. Researchers said pollution may account for nearly 21% of dementia cases. Results of the study were published in the journal Translational Psychiatry with the title “Particulate Air Pollutants, APOE Alleles And Their Contributions To Cognitive Impairment In Older Women And To Amyloidogenesis In Experimental Models.” "Microscopic particles generated by fossil fuels get into our body directly through the nose into the brain," Caleb Finch, PhD, one of the study’s senior authors, explained in a press release. "Cells in the brain treat these particles as invaders and react with inflammatory responses, which over the course of time appear to exacerbate and promote Alzheimer's disease. "Although the link between air pollution and Alzheimer's disease is a new scientific frontier, we now have evidence that air pollution, like tobacco, is dangerous to the aging brain," Finch said. Re
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