High Levels of Vitamin B12 in Marmite May Help Prevent Dementia and Alzheimer’s

High Levels of Vitamin B12 in Marmite May Help Prevent Dementia and Alzheimer’s
The high concentration of vitamin B12 in Marmite — a distinctly British food spread that many say is an acquired taste — was found to increase levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) chemicals in the brain, which may protect against neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy or depression. This is according to recent research from York University in Ontario, Canada. Marmite, though unknown to many Americans, is a popular European yeast extract-based spread fortified with vitamin B12, which is known for its role in the production of healthy levels of red blood cells, which in turn are needed to deliver oxygen to the body’s cells and tissues. In this study, B12 has been shown to help fight off fatigue as well as boost brain power, concentration and memory. The study, titled “Dietary modulation of cortical excitation and inhibition,” was published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology. Participants in the study at York ate a teaspoon of Marmite daily for a month. Their results were then compared to a control group who was given peanut butter. The Marmite group showed a substantial reduction of around 30 percent in the brain’s response to visual stimuli, measured by recording electrical activity with electroencephalography (EEG). Researchers think this is because the prevalence of vitamin B12 increases the levels of GABA neurotransmitters in the brain. GABA imbalances are also associated with a variety of neurological disorders
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