Protein Clumps in Alzheimer’s Share Features with Parkinson’s and Huntington’s, Study Finds

Protein Clumps in Alzheimer’s Share Features with Parkinson’s and Huntington’s, Study Finds
Researchers have discovered a common link between abnormal proteins that cause damage to brain cells in Alzheimer’s (AD), Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s (HD) disease patients. The discovery could help scientists understand the mechanism by which these neurodegenerative diseases spread, and possibly lead to a therapy that targets multiple diseases, according to a new study. The study, “Endocytic vesicle rupture is a conserved mechanism of cellular invasion by amyloid proteins,” was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica. All three are progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorders caused by the death of diverse types of brain cells, including neurons. Different diseases affect different regions of the brain. Alzheimer's impairs learning and memory, and Parkinson's and Huntington's mostly affect movement. Protein clumps are found inside brain cells of people with all three diseases. These clumps are the result of abnormal protein formation and can spread from cell to cell, ultimately causing cell death. Different proteins form aggregates in each disease: tau in AD, alpha-synuclein in PD, and huntingtin in HD. “A possi
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