Women with Genetic Risk of Alzheimer’s More Likely than Men to Develop It Between Age 65 and 75, Study Finds

Women with Genetic Risk of Alzheimer’s More Likely than Men to Develop It Between Age 65 and 75, Study Finds
White women whose genes put them at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease are more likely than white men with similar risk genes to be diagnosed between the ages of 65 and 75, a study drawing on patient data in North America and Europe reports. Overall, between the ages of 55 and 85, Caucasian men and women with a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer's had an equal risk of the disease. That risk, however, rose notably in women during that 10-year span of life, an outcome the study's researchers thought deserving of close investigation in clinical trials. The study, “Apolipoprotein E Genotype and Sex Risk Factors for Alzheimer Disease: A Meta-analysis,” was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Neurology. Researchers at the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine led the study. Data analyzed came from the Global Alzheimer's Association Interactive Network (GAAIN), and included records of  57,979 North Americans and Europeans. "Our discovery is important because it highlights how clinical trials could be weighted toward women — a susceptible part of the population — to help scientists more rapidly identify effective drug interventions to slow or cure Alzheimer's," Arthur Toga, director of the Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute at Keck, said in a press release. Historically, women have been underrepresented
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