JAX Researcher Awarded $5.4M to Study Cognitive Resilience in Early-onset Alzheimer’s

JAX Researcher Awarded $5.4M to Study Cognitive Resilience in Early-onset Alzheimer’s
A researcher at the Jackson Laboratory (JAX) in Maine has been awarded a five-year, $5.4 million grant to investigate why genetic mutations linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) — and found people with a family history of the disease — don't always affect memory and cognition. Assistant professor Catherine Kaczorowski received the award from the National Institute on Aging, a branch of the National Institutes of Health. Using a mouse model, she will study the genetic factors behind what is known as "cognitive resilience" in Alzheimer's, and how those factors might help in discovering new targets and pathways to treat and prevent this disease, according to a JAX press release. The genetic mutations that mark people with a family history of Alzheimer's typically are associated with the more rare, early-onset type of AD, whose symptoms can begin as early as age 30. But the researcher believes this line of inquiry could also lead to a better understanding of late-onset Alzheimer's, a more common form of the disease and one with no known genetic cause. Kaczorowski was also recently awarded $60,000 by  The Glenn Foundation for Medical Research for her work in biological mechanisms of aging. And she received a five-year, $2.7 million grant, also from 
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