UCLA Study Predicts 15 Million Americans Will Have Alzheimer’s or Cognitive Impairment by 2060

UCLA Study Predicts 15 Million Americans Will Have Alzheimer’s or Cognitive Impairment by 2060
The number of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment, which can be a precursor to the disease, will more than double to 15 million by 2060, according to a new UCLA Fielding School of Public Health study. With funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), UCLA researchers looked at the largest studies made on rates of Alzheimer’s progression and compiled that information in a computer model that was specifically built to analyze the aging of the United States population. The model projected the numbers of people in preclinical and clinical disease states. After assessing these results, the researchers found that about 5.7 million Americans will have mild cognitive impairment (an intermediate clinical stage that does not yet meet the criteria for dementia) by 2060 and another 9.3 million will have dementia due to Alzheimer’s. In this group, about 4 million will need intensive care service, similar to that provided by nursing homes. Today, about 6.08 million people in the U.S. have Alzheimer's or mild cognitive impairment, according to the study. The study, “Forecasting the prevalence of preclinical and clinical Alzheimer's disease in the United States,” was published in Alzheimer's and Dementia, the journal of the
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