Funding Renewed for Long-term Study of Adult Children of Alzheimer’s Patients

Funding Renewed for Long-term Study of Adult Children of Alzheimer’s Patients
Washington University researchers have received a $10.3 million grant renewal to continue a long-term study of adults who are more susceptible to developing Alzheimer’s because their parents had it. The team is trying to define which of these adults is likely to develop the disease — and when — and to establish a timeline for how quickly it may progress. The project at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis began in 2005 with funding from the U.S. National Institute on Aging. The Adult Children Study has already helped identify some of the molecular and structural changes in the brain that take place decades before a person is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. The grant renewal will allow the team to extend the study for another five years and to include new goals and methods in it. Medicine has already discovered that the sons and daughters of Alzheimer’s patients are at higher risk of developing the disease themselves. But scientists don't know how to predict which adult children will develop it, or at what age their symptoms will appear. “Our participants want to know if and when they will experience symptoms such as memory loss,” Dr. John C. Morris, the principal investigator of the study, said in a university news story written by Tamara Bhandari. “We anticipate that in the next five years we can begin to tell them.” Morris thin
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.