Nuplazid Can Treat Psychosis in Alzheimer’s Patients But Benefit Only Seen in Short Term, Study Reports

Nuplazid Can Treat Psychosis in Alzheimer’s Patients But Benefit Only Seen in Short Term, Study Reports
Results from a Phase 2 clinical trial show that Nuplazid (pimavanserin) can safely treat, but possibly in the short-term only, symptoms of psychosis in Alzheimer’s patients, a study looking at data from that U.K. trial reports. An accompanying commentary, however, raised concerns about the clinical meaningfulness of these results and findings of safety. More studies are now underway. The research, “Evaluation of the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of pimavanserin versus placebo in patients with Alzheimer's disease psychosis: a phase 2, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study,” appeared in the journal The Lancet Neurology. Approximately 25 to 50 percent of Alzheimer’s patients develop psychotic symptoms over the course of their disease. If untreated, these symptoms may become more severe, taking on a pattern of recovery and relapse. Psychosis in Alzheimer's is associated with more rapid congitive decline, earlier institutionalization, greater caregiver burden, and greater treatment-related mortality. Pimavanserin, being developed by Acadia Pharmaceuticals for dementia-related psychosis, is a selective serotonin inverse agonist that preferentially targets 5-HT2A serotonin receptors that work to transmit signals between nerve cells. In April 2016, Nuplazid became the first drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat hallucinations and delusions associated wit
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