Bryostatin Improves Cognition in Patients with Advanced Alzheimer’s, Analysis Finds

Bryostatin Improves Cognition in Patients with Advanced Alzheimer’s, Analysis Finds
Bryostatin, Neurotrope Bioscience’s investigational therapy, was associated with improved cognition in advanced Alzheimer's disease patients in post-hoc (after-the-fact) analysis of a Phase 2 trial. Results from this study were presented at the Sachs' Neuroscience Innovation Forum on Jan. 7 in San Francisco, California. Bryostatin-1 is a compound known as a protein kinase C (PKC) modulator exerting its effect in specific pathways in the brain. Preclinical studies have shown the compound can generate new connections between nerve cells and also prevent nerve cells' death, thereby improving cognition. The molecule also was found to reduce toxic levels of amyloid-beta levels, prevent plaque formation and inhibit tau phosphorylation. Neurotrope conducted a Phase 2 study (NCT02431468), which included 150 patients with advanced Alzheimer's disease who were randomized to receive either one of two doses of bryostatin, 20 micrograms or 40 micrograms, or placebo. The primary analysis took place at 12 weeks of treatment and the study's primary goal was change in Severe Impairment Battery (SIB) score, a measure of dementia. At week 13, the 20 micrograms (μg) dose was safe and well-tolerated, and showed evidence of sustained improvement in cognition compared to controls. The 40 μg dose did not show an improvement in cognition.
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