Niagen Treatment Leads to Improvements in Alzheimer’s Mouse Model, Study Reports

Niagen Treatment Leads to Improvements in Alzheimer’s Mouse Model, Study Reports
A form of vitamin B3 was found to prevent brain damage and improve memory and physical function in a new mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, suggesting a possible new target for treatment. Mice given ChromaDex’s Niagen (nicotinamide riboside, or NR) — a unique member of the vitamin B3 family — exhibited a wide range of benefits, which researchers attribute to the rejuvenating effect of the compound on stem cells in the brain and muscles. Titled “NAD+ supplementation normalizes key Alzheimer’s features and DNA damage responses in a new AD mouse model with introduced DNA repair deficiency,” the study appeared in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The new mouse model mimics human Alzheimer’s more closely than existing alternatives. Mice exhibit brain alterations observed in humans with the disease, such as aggregates of an intracellular protein called tau, dysfunction of synapses, neuronal death, and cognitive impairment. The transgenic mice also have reduced levels of a molecule called NAD+, indicating impaired energy metabolism in the brain. NAD+ is responsible for maintaining the proper function of mitochondria, the cell’s power supply, enabling stem cell renewal, and boosting neuronal defenses. However, NAD+ levels decline with age, which may lead to DNA damage in the brain and contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. Mice were given NR — a source of NAD+ — in drinking water over three months. Animals receiving NR had reduced tangles in th
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