High Levels of Free Triiodothyronine Associated with Reduced Alzheimer’s Risk in Patients with Cognitive Impairment

High Levels of Free Triiodothyronine Associated with Reduced Alzheimer’s Risk in Patients with Cognitive Impairment
High levels of free triiodothyronine — a type of thyroid hormone — are associated with a lower rate of Alzheimer’s disease risk in patients who have subjective or objective mild cognitive impairment, a new study shows. The study, “Low serum concentration of free triiodothyronine (FT3) is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease,” was published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology. Thyroid hormone (TH) receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain. They are essential for the developing central nervous system (CNS) in a fetus and can influence the adult CNS by promoting nerve development and cellular repair. The thyroid gland is responsible for the production of two main hormones — thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) — upon stimulation by the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). While very high or very low levels of thyroid hormones can cause different types of disease, studies have shown that variations within the normal range have also been associated with increased risk of age-associated impairments and mortality. Epidemiological studies have shown that high thyroid hormone levels are associated with increased risk of dementia. However, specific studies conducted in Alzheimer’s disease patients suggest that thyroid hormone concentrations may actually be lower compared to those of healthy individuals. But little is known about the predictive role of these hormones during early disease stages, when patients show signs of cognitive dysfunction but do not have clinically detectable dementia. Now, researchers conducted a study in patients with subje
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