Common Antidepressants May Prevent Beta-Amyloid Aggregates in Alzheimer’s, Study Reports

Common Antidepressants May Prevent Beta-Amyloid Aggregates in Alzheimer’s, Study Reports
Commonly used antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, can prevent beta-amyloid aggregation, representing a potential new therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease, a study suggests. The study, “Interactions of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors with β-Amyloid,” was published in ACS Chemical Neuroscience. The process of developing and approving new therapies is very expensive, but more importantly, it can take between 10 and 15 years to complete, if it's successful at all. This is a major disadvantage for those living with progressive diseases that lack effective treatments, such as Alzheimer’s disease. To more quickly and easily find suitable therapies for these diseases, a more attractive strategy involves testing already approved therapies for new applications, also known as drug repurposing. To this end, recent studies have suggested that antidepressant medications belonging to the class of SSRIs might improve thinking ability by preventing the aggregation of beta-amyloid molecules. Based on this evidence, researchers at the University of Waterloo in Canada tested several commonly used antidepressants as potential therapies for Alzheimer’s. In particular, they evaluated the effects of
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